Obrechtstraat

Obrechtstraat stopped dead at the Atlantic Wall.

This street is part of the Duinoord neighbourhood, developed in the late 19th century on the initiative of banker Daniël Scheurleer. Designed as a residential area for the upper and middle classes, the development was spacious and frivolous in appearance – very different from the plainer housing areas built earlier. To ensure greater variety in the street frontages, there was even a competition for the best design for a house facade.

Obrechtstraat is one of the long, curving streets that surround Sweelinckplein (the heart of Duinoord). Originally, the street continued to a junction with today’s President Kennedylaan (then Stadhoudersplein).

In 1944 a section of Obrechtstraat was demolished to make way for the Atlantic Wall. Another section was evacuated and declared a no-go area. During the last, desperate winter of the war, all the wood in the empty houses was slowly but surely plundered for fuel and by the time of the liberation little but ruins remained. 

PictureObrechtstraat now
Conradkade, backside of Obrechtstraat

Conradkade, backside of Obrechtstraat, 1931. The Hague City Archives

Conradkade, backside of Obrechtstraat

Conradkade, backside of Obrechtstraat, c. 1933. The Hague City Archives

Obrechtstraat, 1945

Obrechtstraat, July 1945. The Hague City Archives

Obrechtstraat, 1945

Obrechtstraat, 1945. The Hague City Archives

Obrechtstraat, 1946

Obrechtstraat, 1946. The Hague City Archives

Obrechtstraat,1945

Obrechtstraat, July1945. The Hague City Archives

Fragment of Dudok's reconstruction plan for this area

Dudok's reconstruction plan for this area

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